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Can dogs eat jolly ranchers

Can dogs eat jolly ranchers


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Can dogs eat jolly ranchers (dried apricots) raw or cooked?

My dog loves jolly ranchers (dried apricots) that I get at the grocery store. I buy them to put in his kibble. Do you think he will be OK if I don't boil them? I have read that if they are too dried up that they can have a laxative affect.

I know this is a long thread, but does anyone have any info about this?

I would boil them. I have seen a number of threads regarding dried fruits and their effects on dogs, however I have never seen any info pertaining to raw or cooked jolly ranchers. The best thing you can do for your dog is make sure he gets a quality pet food and a regular vet visit.

I have a few kibble brands at home that I will not put dried fruits into. I will use only natural treats that have no additives, preservatives, colors, etc.

I have been thinking about getting a dog. Do you think I would be able to feed him raw bones and raw or cooked jolly ranchers?

I have read a lot of threads about dried fruits and their effects on dogs.

Thank you for the answer.

"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so" - Mark Twain

The biggest risk would be if the dog eats too much raw meat, raw bones, or raw fruit, then becomes too full and starts experiencing stomach upset, and this could be dangerous.

I wouldn't worry so much about dried apricots, they aren't going to give him a real problem. Just be careful to boil them. You could also use dried mangoes or prunes instead.

Dried fruit, like nuts, should only be added to a dog's diet on an occasional basis to prevent over-feeding. This will ensure that you're not creating a problem by over-feeding your dog.

"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so" - Mark Twain

The biggest risk would be if the dog eats too much raw meat, raw bones, or raw fruit, then becomes too full and starts experiencing stomach upset, and this could be dangerous.

I wouldn't worry so much about dried apricots, they aren't going to give him a real problem. Just be careful to boil them. You could also use dried mangoes or prunes instead.

Dried fruit, like nuts, should only be added to a dog's diet on an occasional basis to prevent over-feeding. This will ensure that you're not creating a problem by over-feeding your dog.

This.

Mostly, dried fruit isn't really a concern unless it's very high in sugar content. And even then, you're usually better off giving your dog more frequent meals than he would normally have, anyway. And of course, you have to be careful to get only those with low-sugar content, or your dog could end up with a yeast infection or some other problem.

"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so" - Mark Twain

Mostly, dried fruit isn't really a concern unless it's very high in sugar content. And even then, you're usually better off giving your dog more frequent meals than he would normally have, anyway. And of course, you have to be careful to get only those with low-sugar content, or your dog could end up with a yeast infection or some other problem.

Dried fruit, like nuts, should only be added to a dog's diet on an occasional basis to prevent over-feeding. This will ensure that you're not creating a problem by over-feeding your dog.

This.

Mostly, dried fruit isn't really a concern unless it's very high in sugar content. And even then, you're usually better off giving your dog more frequent meals than he would normally have, anyway. And of course, you have to be careful to get only those with low-sugar content, or your dog could end up with a yeast infection or some other problem.

Thanks, this makes a lot of sense.

"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so" - Mark Twain

My dog gets dried prunes and dried apricots a few times a week. I give them to him at meals time and he eats them along with his regular kibble. I haven't seen any ill effects from this.

I'm not sure what they are in but a lot of the dry fruits have some form of fiber. A few even contain psyllium fiber which might have a laxative effect in some dogs.

I'd boil them. Some of the ones I've been using (Dawkins) come with the instruction of boil for 20 minutes before serving to soften the fiber. It might be a good idea to give them to your dog after boiling.

Just boil them for 20-30 minutes before serving, and then let your dog have some. I wouldn't use them a whole lot, but then again, my dog eats a lot of fruit.

I don't worry too much about them because he eats them often, and he's healthy otherwise.

"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so" - Mark Twain

I'd boil them. Some of the ones I've been using (Dawkins) come with the instruction of boil for 20 minutes before serving to soften the fiber. It might be a good idea to give them to your dog after boiling.

Just boil them for 20-30 minutes before serving, and then let your dog have some. I wouldn't use


Watch the video: 12 Human Foods That Are Actually Good For Your Dog (June 2022).


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