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How to keep your cat from jumping after surgery

How to keep your cat from jumping after surgery



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How to keep your cat from jumping after surgery

I have had many cats who have needed their ears cleaned over the years, and as you can imagine the process can be pretty traumatic for the cat. They do seem to be able to cope with the pain, but I've never heard of it being a pleasant experience for them.

In some cases, this can cause the cat to suffer from anxiety and can even lead to some cats trying to bite themselves and others.

I'm thinking about a procedure I read about a few weeks ago to help your cat recover a bit more quickly, so I was wondering if anyone could give me some advice about the process and how to make the cat comfortable.

I think what most people do is place a muzzle on the cat, but that doesn't seem very safe for a cat. Is there another option?

Thanks in advance.

P.S. I have one cat, so I'm not sure if this is common or not.

CAT MEDS

I don't think this would help, as it would only make it easier for your cat to bite himself. I've tried this with a couple of cats (after ear cleaning) and it didn't help. They seem to be more upset by the procedure than by the anesthesia.

I have had many cats who have needed their ears cleaned over the years, and as you can imagine the process can be pretty traumatic for the cat. They do seem to be able to cope with the pain, but I've never heard of it being a pleasant experience for them.

In some cases, this can cause the cat to suffer from anxiety and can even lead to some cats trying to bite themselves and others.

I'm thinking about a procedure I read about a few weeks ago to help your cat recover a bit more quickly, so I was wondering if anyone could give me some advice about the process and how to make the cat comfortable.

I think what most people do is place a muzzle on the cat, but that doesn't seem very safe for a cat. Is there another option?

Thanks in advance.

P.S. I have one cat, so I'm not sure if this is common or not.

The best thing you can do is sedate your cat.

You could use a combination of Midazolam (which is used in veterinary anesthesia) and butorphanol (a short-acting opioid that reduces pain and anxiety and sedates animals)

Sedating the animal makes the surgery much more manageable for everyone, and the stress of the surgery itself is reduced.

You can put the cat into a light sleep with a dosage of butorphanol that is sufficient to reduce the pain and suffering of the cat.

I don't know if Midazolam is available in your country, but if it is it will likely be more expensive. Butorphanol is available over the counter and I have had good results with it before, so if you can't find Midazolam you could try that.

You can put the cat into a light sleep with a dosage of butorphanol that is sufficient to reduce the pain and suffering of the cat.

I don't know if Midazolam is available in your country, but if it is it will likely be more expensive. Butorphanol is available over the counter and I have had good results with it before, so if you can't find Midazolam you could try that.

In my country the price is about $10/10mg - a pretty cheap medication that will work well to calm a cat down and make the surgery easier on the cat.

You can put the cat into a light sleep with a dosage of butorphanol that is sufficient to reduce the pain and suffering of the cat.

I don't know if Midazolam is available in your country, but if it is it will likely be more expensive. Butorphanol is available over the counter and I have had good results with it before, so if you can't find Midazolam you could try that.

In my country the price is about $10/10mg - a pretty cheap medication that will work well to calm a cat down and make the surgery easier on the cat.

So the sedation and the surgery itself are the only things your cat has to endure?

If you can find a solution that will make your cat comfortable, and you can easily administer the medication (without a muzzle on the cat's face) without having to worry about the cat biting themselves or other things, I think this is a good option.

The only way this will work is if your cat has been trained to accept a muzzle for the procedure in the past.

If your cat hasn't had ear cleaning surgery in the past, I'd go with sedation. Otherwise, there are plenty of other options. The options vary depending on your budget, your cat's breed, etc.

Sedation is really the only way to go here. Your cat's body isn't capable of dealing with the pain of the procedure, and there are all kinds of risks involved in muzzling your cat. You don't want your cat to be muzzled for anything, so I wouldn't use a muzzle unless it's something you have experience with. And even then, it's probably not a good idea.

If I were doing this for a new cat that had never had the procedure, I would give it a sedative to help it through the procedure. You can even give it a small dose of butorphanol if you want to help the cat relax more.

I don't know what the costs are where you live, but here they are for butorphanol (I think the dosage is 5mg):

I think what most people do is place a muzzle on the cat, but that doesn't seem very safe for a cat. Is there another option?

It's actually very safe. A lot of people use the muzzle for sedation too, because a cat can get really anxious over something like ear cleaning or having a mole removed.

I wouldn't recommend using a muzzle


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